Jonathan Rogers Park is less than two block away from the Go Green bottle depot, so I ride by it a lot. I also stop and enjoy it from time to time.

The park boasts a washroom, soccer goal posts, a small children’s play area, a concrete wading pool which has not deliberately been filled in living memory, and a small community garden. Mostly it is a one block rectangle of grass fringed on two sides by trees—and residents seem to like it that way.

Looking at it, big picture-wise

Jonathan Rogers Park is a good illustration of why I think fields of green are irresistible to cash-strapped cities.

Sometimes you want some freebie a website is offering—a music file, a report, perhaps a technical preview of their new operating system. Often as not the website requires you to sign up and provide personal details such as your name and email.

Quite likely the whole point of offering the freebie is to harvest your personal information.

Before it will hand the thing over, the website may further insist on sending you a message with a link you have to click on to verify the email address you supplied.

Flamenco singer Diego El Cigala makes his Vancouver debut at UBC’s Chan Centre for the Performing Arts (6265 Crescent Road) on Friday (October 25) at 8 p.m.

Heralded as one of Spain’s most electrifying and innovative performers, El Cigala has transfixed audiences around the world with his deeply emotional performances that seamlessly blend flamenco, tango, Latin jazz, bolero, and son.

“Vancouver possesses a thriving hotbed of flamenco culture and I am thrilled to bring one of the great voices of our century here,” Joyce Hinton, Chan Centre’s co-managing director, stated in a news release. “Diego’s earthy and richly emotive voice is guaranteed to resonate strongly with audience members.”

After the coffee house chain JJ Bean angered many Cambie Village residents last August by destroying a popular mural on the side of their new Cambie Street location, the established Starbucks coffee house a block away has created a pleasing new mural of its own.

The mural is on the south side of the Sturbucks coffee shop on the southeast corner of Cambie Street and 19th Avenue. It depicts a view looking north down Cambie Street towards Vancouver’s downtown skyline.

The mural seems finished but for a large white oval hole which is the exact shape needed to contain a Starbucks logo. In fact the entire mural is painted almost exclusively in the colour palette of the Starbucks logo: black, white, and green.

Couldn't make it out last night? You missed psychedelia-swirled shoegazers The Horrors at the Rickshaw. Melanie Talkington was there and caught a moment of the show on Instagram. Here’s your concert pic of the morning. The Horrors at the Rickshaw Theatre on October 19, 2014. Thanks Melanie.

You’ll see a lot of people going through the Dumpsters in the back alleys of Vancouver but you won’t see a lot see them doing it wearing a long black overcoat topped with a black fedora.

I only ever knew one Dumpster diver who made a habit of dressing like this and I haven’t seen him for at least four years.

His name was Daryl—a very nice, soft-spoken fellow. Eccentric and artistic. He made interesting things with many of the interesting things he scavenged.

But lo and behold the man in black I saw on Friday was Daryl. He was back! As laconic as ever and still dressing like an extra from the old television show Dragnet.

In the early hours of October 17, a Russian cargo ship lost power and began drifting toward B.C.'s coast.

The vessel is carrying  500 metric tonnes of bunker fuel and 60 tonnes of diesel. At the time of writing, it remained without power and continued to slowly move in the direction of land.

At 5 p.m., the Haida Nation released an update on the situation. The unedited text of that statement appears below.

Be careful if you encounter one of these bright red, luscious looking mushrooms.

Amanita muscaria, as it's known to mycologists, is considered to be poisonous, though detoxification can supposedly occur if thin slices are boiled in water.

These toadstools are growing all over Vancouver as a result of recent downpours.

According to the Pulpfiction Books Twitter feed, there's a large crop beside the former east wing of Vancouver City Hall.

Poison near the seat of city government? Say it ain't so.

The Vancouver Native Housing Society opened its doors Thursday (October 16) for a tour of Skwachàys Lodge, a facility that the organization says is the first aboriginal arts and culture hotel in Canada.

The newly revamped boutique hotel on West Pender Street has been open for business since August, hosting visitors in 18 rooms that feature original work from aboriginal artists.

Vancouver Native Housing CEO David Eddy said the hotel was at about 75 percent occupancy in August. Seasonal rates for the rooms, which each feature different designs, start at $149 a night.

Earlier this year, Vancouver-based restaurant chain Earls Kitchen + Bar unveiled a test kitchen at one of its downtown locations and a product-development team that included some of the city’s most accomplished chefs.

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