BCTF vice president Glen Hansman shows that not all unions are settling for net-zero contracts

The second vice president of the B.C. Teachers' Federation has kept his fingers busy this morning tweeting about labour contracts.

Glen Hasman pointed out there are lots of unions that have negotiated contracts without the net-zero provision so beloved by Education Minister George Abbott.

Here are some recent contract agreements that Hasman has highlighted on his Twitter stream:

• Courtenay municipal employees received two percent in 2011, two percent in 2012, 2.75 percent in 2013, and 2.25 percent in 2014.

• Quesnel municipal employees received zero percent in 2010, 1.5 percent in 2011, and two percent in 2012.

• Vancouver police received 2.95 percent in 2010, 2.95 percent in 2011, 1.25 percent in 2012, and 1.3 percent in 2013.

• Comox District employees received two percent in 2010, two percent in 2011, three percent percent in 2012, and two percent percent in 2013.

• Global TV received 3.5 percent in 2011, 2.5 percent in 2012, and two percent in 2013.

• Kamloops municipal employees received two percent in 2011, two percent in 2012, and two percent in 2013.

Comments (22) Add New Comment
lawson45
I do not care what other unions do, teachers are not getting or deserve a raise, what is it you do not understand about net -zero it means net-zero
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Morty
I find it hard to take seriously comments on teachers that obey none of the standard rules of grammar or punctuation.
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soundy106
None of those other unions are BC Gov't unions and so don't have a net-zero mandate to deal with in the first place. Apples and oranges, Glen. FAIL.
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B Hanson
How many received an up to $4000 signing bonus.
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Hamish Winter
New Highway to Whister $1,000,000,000
New Convention Centre $800,000,000
New Hideous BC Place $600,000,000
Total cost over runs @ $1.3 Billion

Salary raise for MLA, 29%
Money for BCTF, HEU, Net Zero.

What's wrong with picture? http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article7260.htm





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GOT
Mr Hansman's information would be more useful if he identified the unions negotiating those increases.
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ds
It doesn't matter what union it is, they're still public servant with a higher education than some sitting in Victoria telling us what is best for the rest of us. If they were true leaders they would lead by example and roll back their wages along with their gold plated pensions rather than evryone else having to do without.
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GOT
My point about identifying the unions is that some workers are in government unions (CUPE, etc) and others may be in Teamsters or unions which are not necessarily under the net-zero hammer. Personally I support all unions and believe they are the responsible way to negotiate.
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CClark
When teacher's bargained locally, a municipal union increase could mobilize support for a teacher's local asking for an increase as well. Now that they have been forced to become a union, and are an "essential service", and are not permitted to bargain, the BCTF will only get scapegoated.

However, back in the day, "Essential Services" meant fire, life, and property protection. Under the liberals, anyone who dares to stand up to the government, is called essential, to limit their ability to bargain.
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CClark
I searched "Fascism" and read that making strikes illegal an scapegoating groups is a major part of the Fascist handbook. I guess that explains why teachers, who do not offer essential services, are denied the right to strike, even when it is permitted under highly restrictive limits imposed by the LRB.
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glen p robbins
I take the position that this is valuable and relevant information to the discussion of the Teachers - BC Liberal Government debate. Many of these examples involve public sector unions involving tax payer dollars. The wage increases are no vastly different than the request of the BC Teachers. Therefore we have precedent/principle which contradicts George Abbott's (BC Min. of Ed) position of "all" unions within zero mandate. Mr. Abbott has used this in negotiations dishonestly imo. He has consistently maintained a position which is not factual.

Accordingly, we have public sectors unions with raises of 2 per cent and more - that's a starting point. The BC Teachers need to quantify what wage increase they would live with - not just spin an overall position.

The other variable is the one which is more distinct to Teachers - that of essential service. Does this 'designation' mean that the service Teachers provide is more valuable - or does it mean that breaking collective bargaining is more necessary. I would be inclined to lean toward the value of the service.

I believe that 1.5%, 1.5%, 2.0%, 2.5%, 2.5%, 3.0% should be offered to the Teachers. A six year deal with slightly less over the first 2 years - slightly more over the third, more in the fourth and fifth and more in year 6 taking us to 2018 - an average of 2.16% each year back end loaded at 2.67% annual average in the final three years.
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Birdy
All this 1.5%, 3%, crap is completely irrelevant.

The Canadian dollar is being manipulated by the Bank of Canada to keep it at par with the American dollar, which is allegedly losing value at a rate of 2% a year, according to CPI.

CPI was altered (energy and food removed from the basket) during the Clinton administration.

Using the old (REAL) CPI, inflation is at 8%

3% raise + CAD pegged to USD + real inflation = ~5% pay cut.
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Steve Y
Privatize education. Give every parent the $10,000 per kid school funds and let them choose their own school to send kids to.
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Salty One
The municipal contracts have nothing to do with the province, which holds jurisdiction over education. Global is a private corporation that has nothing to do with the province. The Vancouver City Police has nothing to do with the province either.
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Nunya Biznis
Teachers are considered an essential service because they are glorified babysitters and without them, parents who live in the real world would not be able to go to work. These teachers spend their entire life within the education system so it is quite understandable that their views and grip on reality are skewed and limited at best. It takes a special person tobecome a teacher, that I can agree with.
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Norm Farrell
Helping manage the BC government's war on school teachers and public education is Deputy Minister of Education James Gorman. He is a long time senior bureaucrat.

Public accounts show his salary in fiscal 2006 was $164,085. In fiscal 2011, it was $228,942, an increase of 40% in five years. During that period, Gorman's expenses were $136,616.

Gorman looks positively frugal compared to his colleague Rick Davis. The Education Ministry's Superintendent of Achievement incurred expenses of $432,234 from 2006 to 2011. Spending more than $6,000 a month on lunches and such can't leave much time for business but Davis is consistent, if nothing else.

John Dyble, Premier Photo-Op's Deputy Minister, has also done well in the land of not net zero. Public accounts show that Dyble's salary rose from $161,455 in fiscal 2006 to $239,121 in 2011. That was a 48% gain in five years but, the good news for Dyble is that his salary was bumped again in March 2011. His new rate is $310,000, about double what he earned five years ago.

Net-zero does not apply to most of the senior bureaucrats in Victoria. Public Accounts tell the tales.

http://northerninsights.blogspot.com/2012/03/adventures-in-not-net-zero-...

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glen p robbins
Birdy - I don't know how or why a discussion of percentages linked to wages in the midst of the beginning of the strike could ever be considered "crap" or "completely irrelevant". The discussion of cost of living you provide as relevant pertains more to a macro discussion of labour issues generally.

Steve Y- Logistically difficult to impossible - attractive theoretically only imo

Municipal contracts described in the article are relevant for the reasons I provided earlier in the stream because they involve government and union and are completely applicable in a 'legal rationale' point of sense. The Vancouver Police is another excellent example because Vancouver City is government and the police are also an essential service.

NB - circular reasoning (at best) - riddled with bias - would you mind getting us some coffee please.

Norm - excellent work imo relevant for external context as it is Government that is saying no more money while Government MLA's take more pay and the mandarins in the room with them are obviously deep in the trough - not leading by example - makes Mr. Abbott's position disingenuous. Birdy exempt the attitude would work well in conjunction with your effort.

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GOT
@ Nunya Biznis..."These teachers spend their entire life within the education system so it is quite understandable that their views and grip on reality are skewed and limited at best."...unlike yourself, who clearly spent very little of your life in the education system.
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Birdy
re: Glen

I was just saying that arguing about increases so small that they don't even offset inflation is kind of meaningless, it wasn't a critique of your post. The America-appeasing inflationary environment we're in matters in all discussions related to money, and money is what we're talking about here.

The only "fix" for this education problem is to begin relaxing regulations to allow the creation of different types of schools (private for-profit, and private non-profit) to serve different types of students, rather than continuing to prop up the monolithic mind-crushing failure of coercively-funded centrally planned government indoctrination institutions.

Unfortunately, things will have to get a lot worse for even half the population to realize that schools need to be funded voluntarily, based on the resources used by each student, in order to function properly and sustainably.
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petr aardvark
you know, running a small business in this economy - I've taken a paycut for the last couple of years just to stay in business, so when I see teachers demanding a 15% increase and other benefits I can see they're out of touch with reality. The rest of us would love to have 12 weeks off a year, and countless pro-d-days (sure they're important - ask the teachers at Eric Hamber, who spent them playing ping-pong and going on a hayride last fall - and coincidentally they always fall just before a long weekend). Regarding the class size - though numerous studies have shown that class size makes no difference in the long run - compare Japanese, Chinese and French students who all have bigger class sizes and somehow manage to be ahead of Canadian students, if the ministry gives in on the class size - are the teachers willing to give in and institute a merit based pay system?
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