My favourite action movie of all time has got to be Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior, or--as it was known in Canada when it first hit theatres in 1982--The Road Warrior. I remember walking out of the Granville strip moviehouse I saw it in--I think it was the Vogue--and feeling like everything I saw and heard around me seemed a little more vivid than it did two hours earlier. 

It's the same sort of mental buzz I would get four years later from one of my all-time fave horror flicks, The Hitcher.

There's something about brilliantly shot, suspense-stoked chase films that just does that to me, I guess.

The City of Vancouver has invited applications from professional artists for seven low-cost or no-cost studio spaces.

The Vancouver Artist Studio Awards Program will make the studio or live-work space available from 2015 to 2018.

The peer-reviewed process is open to Vancouver-based artists who demonstrate talent and financial need.

Applicants can have expertise in a wide range of art forms, including visual arts, dance, literary arts, theatre, and media arts.

According to a city news release, one live-work studio and one work-only studio are being offered for free.

My blogging made the Province newspaper this morning.

Twelve pages in, underneath a story about a Union Gospel Mission barbeque, there was a small mention of my post about finding Canada Border Security Service guard shirts in an apartment dumpster in the Fairview neighbourhood.

It’s true, when I was growing up in the 1970s, wallpaper and carpets in commercial buildings—hotels, motels, fast food restaurants—often featured garish repeating patterns, just like the painting I found on a the lid of a recycling blue bin yesterday.

The trend continued well into the early 1980s. 

Like Halloween, when the early October fogs start to roll in, and Kanye West when he isn’t cancelling his shows the day they are supposed to happen, it’s starting to feel like it’s almost here.

Yes, we’re talking about the Squamish Valley Music Festival, taking place August 8 to 10 at the Logger Sports Grounds and Hendrickson Fields. In anticipation of the big event—headlined by Eminem, Bruno Mars, and Arcade Fire—we’re spending the next few weeks rounding up local artists who’ll be playing the open-air party, and getting them to answer some important questions.

Some young person or persons with a lot of chalk really played-up the sidewalk in front of their building and in front of their neighbours’ buildings and their neighbour’ neighbours’ buildings.

Who else but a child would spend hours creating art nearly a third of a block long that was temporary by nature?

I was a block away when I heard the drums pounding away in the 400 block of Granville Street.

It was the sounds of the Afro-Brazilian Carnival, which will continue until the early evening.

The road was closed to traffic as part of the Viva Vancouver celebrations taking place through the summer.

The Axé Capoeira Academy was scheduled to put on a demonstration of its talents later in the day.

Unfortunately, I didn't stick around long enough to see this show.

Like Halloween, when the early October fogs start to roll in, and Kanye West when he isn’t cancelling his shows the day they are supposed to happen, it’s starting to feel like it’s almost here.

Yes, we’re talking about the Squamish Valley Music Festival, taking place August 8 to 10 at the Logger Sports Grounds and Hendrickson Fields. In anticipation of the big event—headlined by Eminem, Bruno Mars, and Arcade Fire—we’re spending the next few weeks rounding up local artists who’ll be playing the open-air party, and getting them to answer some important questions.

Greenpeace is taking on a children's toy that has been used in Science World and Vancouver Art Gallery exhibits.

At issue is Lego's affiliation with Shell. Greenpeace is calling for the Lego Group to end its participation in Shell's global advertising deal.

A special set of Lego features the Shell logo on its toys.

Greenpeace argues that Shell is building brand loyalty among children, who are the next generation of consumers. The Vancouver-founded environmental organization is concerned that Shell is using Lego to counter its controversial Arctic drilling plans.

What’s in Your Fridge is where the Straight asks interesting Vancouverites about their life-changing concerts, favourite albums, and, most importantly, what’s sitting beside the Heinz Ketchup in their custom-made Big Chill Retropolitan 20.6 cubic-foot refrigerators.

 

On the grill

Trevor Risk

Who are you

We actually don't have enough space here to tell you everything Trevor Risk does, but here's a short list of some of his many jobs: frontman of dream-pop band Sunshine; freelance writer; club-night promoter and DJ (Come Friday, Ice Cream Social); and project manager, brand ambassador, and all-around arbiter of cool at Light Organ Records. In other words, Risk basically runs this town. 

Pages