Bill C-42 gags the Mounties on torture

A Vancouver human-rights lawyer says she “can’t believe” that Canada is about to pass a law that authorizes violations of an international convention against torture. It also won’t allow Mounties to question intelligence information that has been obtained illegally.

Gail Davidson’s concern about the use of information possibly extracted through torture is shared by current and former RCMP officers who oppose Bill C-42, or the Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act.

“We’re authorizing the police to use their special powers to break the law,” Davidson told the Georgia Straight in a phone interview.

Members of the Mounted Police Professional Association of Canada (MPPAC) have raised a number of issues about the legislation and its provisions tied to national security. One states that an RCMP officer is “not entitled to present a grievance relating to any action taken under any instruction, direction or regulation given or made by or on behalf of the Government of Canada in the interest of the safety or security of Canada or any state allied or associated with Canada”.

Another section mandates that “an order made by the Governor in Council is conclusive proof of the matters stated in the order in relation to the giving or making of an instruction, direction or regulation by or on behalf of the Government of Canada.”

These make Bill C-42 “very dangerous”, according to Davidson, executive director of Lawyers’ Rights Watch Canada. “Police officers have special powers,” she explained. “They have more powers than you or I to use force and to deprive people of their liberty, and the reason they have those powers is to keep the public peace. And keeping the public peace means ensuring that the law, and that is the legitimate laws and the rule of law, are upheld.”

In November this year, Surrey RCMP officer Lloyd Pinsent circulated a paper he wrote with the provocative title “The Terrorists Have Won. RCMP Ordered to Accept Torture-Tainted Information”.

Pinsent’s paper cites Bill C-42 and a CBC report citing a Canadian Press story indicating that Public Safety Minister Vic Toews had directed the RCMP and the Canada Border Services Agency to use and share information that may have been obtained through torture. This order follows a similar directive issued in 2011 to the Canadian Security Intelligence Service.

“While the direction from Minister Toews is in contravention of existing Canadian and international law, under [Bill C-42’s] section 31. (1.4) the order is to be viewed as conclusive proof and questions about the legitimacy of the order are not allowed either,” writes Pinsent, a member of the MPPAC executive in B.C.

The Surrey RCMP constable also notes that although use of information produced through torture violates Canadian and international law, Bill C-42 lays out the sanctions for those who question this practice, including dismissal.

Public Safety Canada did not make a spokesperson available for an interview with the Straight before deadline.

Rob Creasser, a retired RCMP officer and a national spokesperson for the MPPAC, said the proposed legislation puts officers in a damned-if-they-do, damned-if-they-don’t situation when confronted with information derived from torture.

“It places RCMP members in an untenable situation where they’re being directed, it would seem, to break Canadian and international law,” Creasser told the Straight in a phone interview. “And if they complained about it, the new bill, C-42…will also hold them in jeopardy if they voice those concerns publicly, because there’s a provision in that bill where you could be sanctioned for speaking out.”

In June this year, the UN Committee Against Torture released its report on Canada’s compliance with the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. The panel expressed “serious concern” about Toews’s ministerial direction to CSIS, noting that it “could result in violations of article 15 of the Convention in the sense that it allows intelligence information that may have been derived through mistreatment by foreign States to be used within Canada”.

The UN committee was also concerned that the ministerial order “allows CSIS to share information with foreign agencies even when doing so poses a serious risk of torture”. It recommended that Canada modify this ministerial direction to bring it in line with Canada’s obligation under the international convention against torture.

Bill C-42 has passed two of the three required readings in the House of Commons. Considering the UN’s direction for Canada with respect to information gathered from torture, Davidson is shocked that the measure may soon become law. “Instead of saying, ‘Yes, we’ll now take measures to comply with the recommendations so we’re acting in compliance with our convention obligations,’ they’re saying, ‘We’re going to pass a law that authorizes violations.’ I can’t believe that.”

Comments (20) Add New Comment
ejo
Any Conservative MP with an iota of respect for Canada and Canadian ideals will cross the line ASAP and help take this most unCanadian of governments down before it does any more damage to our country and the world.
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Barney Fife
Harper said you wouldn't recognize Canada when he was done with it. Question is, how much more American do Canadians want to be?
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Ryan Heart
One unimaginable embarrassment after the other. I prefer the original Canada that was a human rights defender and upstanding global citizen.
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Shocked and appalled
The Fourth Reich.
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RickW
Well, it was weak-kneed Ontario that put these nazis into power.................
RickW
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nutsnbolts
Stephen Treason Harper the most dangerous sub-human in Canada.
Welcome to Harper's Guantanamo Bay once known as Canada.
He must be charged with treason and when found guilty, hanged by his neck until he is dead. If there was a Satan he is Satan himself.
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Darren Pearson
This story makes me think more and more about a brilliantly written article by Larken Rose, titled "When Should You Shoot a Cop?"
http://content.clearchannel.com/cc-common/mlib/3359/10/3359_1319803260.pdf
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Strategis
While the Harper government condemns Iran for torture, it ignores China's deplorable practises, and praises Israel which practises torture, and is building a culture of torture in Canada. Hypocritical fascists.
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Morty
"[A]n order made by the Governor in Council is conclusive proof of the matters stated in the order in relation to the giving or making of an instruction, direction or regulation by or on behalf of the Government of Canada." So the Cons are saying they can dictate the very fabric of reality? Who does Vic think he is, Kim Jong-Un?
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DMS
dave19
"The terrorists hate us for our freedoms we used to have."

We have become the terrorists.
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FedUpWithTraitors
Totalitarian governments first require a repressive police force, impressive use of the small terrorist threat to further corrupt and groom the RCMP for the role. Just hope there are enough Patriots left in the ranks to stall these traitors.
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Hans Sparreboom
Before Adolf Mao Amin Harper came to power those who said "wait till he gets a fake majority" were ridiculed and laughed at. Guess who should be ridiculed now.
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Ray McGinnis
The MacDonald Commission and the Keeble Inquiry of the late '70's and early 80's uncovered RCMP illegal activities during and after the FLQ Crisis in Quebec. These included burning down a barn by RCMP officers and blaming the FLQ for the incident. It included infiltrating the FLQ (not a problem) but then, as dispirited FLQ members left cell groups the cells continued to send press releases to rattle and unnerve those in Quebec and the rest of Canada. Those cell groups were now being peopled entirely by RCMP staff who had infiltrated the FLQ cell groups. (Once the cell groups were pared of original FLQ members, the RCMP should have reassigned their staff away from groups that no longer were in existence). For these and other activities the Canadian Government (as it was called back then) created CSIS, in part in response to the hit the RCMP took to its reputation, especially in Quebec.
So under Bill C-42 could RCMP be assigned to cell groups of suspected terrorists in our post-9/11 world? Could they infiltrate them and after the demise of original suspect activity perpetuate the appearance of a threat through press releases and the occasional destruction of a barn or other buildings somewhere in Canada? And RCMP officers who might object to these assignments could never blow the whistle due to "national security?"
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FedUpWithTraitors
Excellent point Ray, if anyone reading this is a member of the RCMP and is asked to participate in any "false flag" actions (e.g. possible Enbridge pipeline terrorism) Please remember the oaths you swore as a recruit...
Don't forget the false flag that started WWII, I actually still have some faith that the amazing organization icon the RCMP can fulfill there duty and bring the traitors in our government to justice. Sigh maybe I'm just hopefully nieve?
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keith may
i hate harper
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Alan Ranta
That was a pretty nice country we used to have. I really miss it.
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Mackenna
Notice the mainstream media isn't covering any of this? It's not even a backpage item.
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Bill Jackson
Torture allows you to get the answer you want. It isn't the tool to use when you want an accurate answer, but it's perfect for the politically required answer.
"You give me the man, I'll give you the crime." Hermann Goering.
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Remy
I think its pretty cool.... now authorities can beat the shit out of protesters and pesky citizens obstructing politically connected profits and democratic oppression..... and when called upon .. can cite the magic words "National Security"
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The 99
We are scared, truly scared. The forward march of fascism and tyranny have, almost a century after one of its worst outbursts, resumed. This is how it all begins: legislation couched in terms of protection and "public safety," legislation that erodes or dramatically reverses hundreds of years of progress in human rights. Such progress includes freedom of association, freedom of speech, the right of protest, and most certainly freedom from torture. These well-understood protections for human rights are the foundation stones of democracy.

In the 1930s in Europe, and at many other times and places in human history, the erosion or complete revocation--as we have here in BIll C-42--of such longstanding human rights has always been followed by the rise of tyranny and of international war.

Fight now with your pens and keyboards and body on the street, or you or your children shall have to fight later with laser cannons and nuclear munitions.

Yes, this could get very ugly, and some say it already has.
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