Canadian antivaxxer Chris Sky says he's prepared to die but he'd "rather take all of them with me first"

The Ontario-based author of Just Say No has spoken at rallies in several provinces, including British Columbia

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      One of Canada's most famous antivaxxers has ramped up his rhetoric against government officials who've curtailed business activities to control the spread of COVID-19.

      In an interview posted on the video-hosting service BitChute, Chris Sky said that he's "so ready to die" for his beliefs.

      "You think I want to live in the world they want to create?" Sky said. "I'd rather take them all with me first."

      Sky recently wrote a book called Just Say No, which is his manifesto against COVID-19 vaccines. Even though the number of infections has fallen sharply in many provinces since these immunizations were rolled out, Sky maintains on his Twitter feed that they don't work.

      "Yes, there's no way I'm living in a frigging world with a vaccine passport," Sky said in the interview. "There's no way I'm living in a world where they can shut down my business at any time because they say so. No fucking way. And I think a lot of people around the world are ready to die for what they believe in, too. I mean, you know who's not ready die?"

      On May 20, Toronto Police Service announced five criminal charges against Sky, a.k.a. Chris Saccocia, including three counts of uttering death threats.

      Police have alleged in court documents that he threatened to kill all the premiers in Canada, according to an article in the Toronto Sun. Police have cited a former associate of Sky's, right-wing political activist Rob Carbone, as their source.

      Sky has also been charged with assaulting a police officer and dangerous operation of a conveyance in connection with allegedly injuring a cop when he tried to drive away from officers.

      None of the allegations have been proven in court. 

      Sky has been a headline speaker at two rallies at Sunset Beach in Vancouver protesting public-health orders. 

      During his last appearance on May 23 while he was out on bail, Sky urged police observing the event not to enforce these orders. He tried to convey that antimaskers were friends of the police.

      "They look up to you as heroes," Sky declared. "They look up to you as saviours. They look up to you as their last line of defence against the tyranny being imposed on us."

      Vancouver police have chosen not to fine organizers of antimask rallies, including the last one where Sky was promoting his book.

      This stands in contrast with Kelowna RCMP. It has issued $2,300 tickets to organizers of antimask rallies on at least two occasions because they violated a provincial health order banning public events.

      Transcript of Chris Sky's BitChute interview

      Interviewer: Are you prepared to die for this?

      Chris Sky: Oh hell yeah, I'm so ready to die. You think I want to live in the world they want to create? I'd rather take them all with me first.

      Interviewer: Really.

      Chris Sky: Yes, there's no way I'm living in a frigging world with a vaccine passport. There's no way I'm living in a world where they can shut down my business at any time because they say so. No fucking way. And I think a lot of people around the world are ready to die for what they believe in, too. I mean, you know who's not ready die? The government. They'll turn tail and run.

      Interviewer: Holding on.

      Chris Sky: They're holding on because of financial interests, because they're being pressured.

      Interviewer: Yeah.

      Chris Sky: So when you got that—up against people that are fighting for their very lives—you got no chance. 

      Interviewer: We outnumber them.

      Chris Sky: Forget the numbers. When you have someone fighting for money versus someone fighting for freedom, it's not even a comparison.

      Interviewer: That's true.

      Chris Sky: Big time.

      Interviewer: Big time.

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