LGBT in B.C.: Coquitlam and Merritt get rainbow crosswalks, Port Moody to install one, Campbell River bans them

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      Rainbow crosswalks have been popping up all over British Columbia, ever since Vancouver unveiled Canada's first colourful pedestrian crossings at Bute and Davie streets in 2013.

      Cities and towns from Victoria, Nanaimo, and Masset to Whistler and Squamish to Vernon, Terrace, and Castlegar have all had them installed.

      While some communities have been supportive of them, others have debated over them, and still others have witnessed vandalism.

      The most recent installation is in Metro Vancouver.

      A proposal to the City of Coquitlam in September 2017 sparked a divisive debate last year, but was approved of in October.

      The city installed a rainbow crosswalk on March 28. The crosswalk, which cost approximately $10,000, is located on Burlington Drive at Pinetree Way, next to Coquitlam city hall.

      Meanwhile the City of Port Coquitlam is considering an art project to honour local LGBT communities.

      On March 27, councillors voted to spend $20,000 on an inclusive public art installation.

      In September, Port Moody city council voted to install a rainbow crosswalk, but the location is yet to be decided upon.

      After Merritt city council voted on February 27 against a request for a rainbow crosswalk from youth groups, several individuals came forward to offer alternatives, including two Vancouver lawyers who offered parking lots that they owned in the town.

      In the end, the students and school district accepted an offer from the owners of Merritt's Coldwater Hotel and painted a rainbow in their parking lot on March 25.

      Over on Vancouver Island, Campbell River city council decided on March 19 to no longer permit non-standardized crosswalk markings, such as the rainbow crosswalk painted two years ago, for safety and financial reasons. 

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