Photos: Automakers show off cars of the future in Las Vegas at Consumer Electronics Show 2017

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      The Twizy is unlike any other vehicle on the market.

      Manufactured by French automaker Renault, this one-seater runs on a lithium-iron battery and offers unbeatable turning power into tight parking spots.

      The newest iteration is one of many vehicles of the future on display at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.

      The four-day CES 2017 is expected to shatter last year's attendance record of 177,393 by the time it ends today (January 8).

      While various versions of the Twizy are already for sale, several prototypes of driverless vehicles are also at CES 2017. (See images below.)

      Dan McLeod

      Chrysler's autonomous car is driven by Portal software.

      Dan McLeod

      If you're interested in a vehicle with Italian flair, check out this Maserati, which was tricked out by Qualcomm.

      Dan McLeod

      German automaker BMW has one of the more elaborate autonomous-vehicle displays at CES 2017. You can check out different angles of the vehicle in the two images below.

      Dan McLeod
      Dan McLeod

      BMW's razzle-dazzle was outdone by the folks at Toyota. The crowds at CES 2017 witnessed the wings of its space-age vehicle folding down to futuristic music.

      Dan McLeod
      Dan McLeod
      Dan McLeod

      Meanwhile, Honda has unveiled its plans for an autonomous two-seater.

      Dan McLeod

      Nissan's autonomous vehicle has some things in common with a modern racecar, minus the driving, of course.

      Dan McLeod

      Mercedes chose a more conventional-looking autonomous car to display.

      Dan McLeod

      However, the Mercedes Vision Van at CES 2017 has some unusual gadgetry, including integrated drones and robotic arms. It runs on a 75-kilowatt electric-drive system, which goes 270 kilometres before needing to be recharged.

      Dan McLeod
      Dan McLeod

      Hyundai demonstrated how it's possible to leave your hands off the steering wheel and still reach your destination.

      Dan McLeod
      Dan McLeod
      Dan McLeod

      Canadian software company Blackberry is also at CES 2017 showing off how its software can help driverless cars avoid collisions in the future.

      Dan McLeod

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